The Two Faces of January hits VOD and digital platforms on August 28, and opens in US theaters on September 26.

In 1962, the charismatic Chester MacFarland (Viggo Mortensen) and his alluring younger wife Colette (Kirsten Dunst), arrive in Athens by boat via the Corinthian Canal. While sightseeing at the Acropolis they encounter Rydal (Oscar Isaac), a young, Greek-speaking American who is working as a tour guide, scamming tourists on the side. Drawn to Colette’s beauty and impressed by Chester’s wealth and sophistication, Rydal gladly accepts their invitation to dinner. However, all is not as it seems with the MacFarlands and Chester’s affable exterior hides darker secrets.

Movies.Yahoo.comAfter Harrison Ford’s recent on set injury, it looks as though newcomer Oscar Isaac will be getting an extended role in ‘Star Wars VII’.

It’s been an uncertain time on the ‘Star Wars’ set lately, after Harrison Ford’s ankle injury caused the 71-year-old star to be pulled out of the production for the foreseeable future. But with rumours that he could shoot some scenes from the waist up, is he really up to it? It looks as though he may have his duties shipped out to another actor, with Oscar Isaac tipped to get an extended role…

According to NY Post, the 35-year-old ‘Star Wars’ newcomer will take on an extended role in the upcoming sequel due to Harrison Ford’s recent injury. “Hollywood sources say that star Oscar Isaac’s role in the movie is being expanded,” they revealed. “After Ford was injured on the sci-fi epic’s set, spies say Isaac’s part is now being extended as a Plan B.”

Of course, details of Isaac’s role have been kept tightly under wraps since he was announced as part of the new cast back in April. But with speculation that he could take on the role of Han Solo’s son, it sounds as though beefing up his role in the film to take over from Harrison Ford is probably a good idea.

Added to our site are screencaps of Oscar Isaac in the trailer of his new short “Ticky Tacky. You can check them out below.

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I finally had the chance to add screencaptures of Oscar Isaac in Inside LLewyn Davis to our gallery. If you haven’t seen the movie, I highly recommend you add this one to your watch list! Oscar’s performance was brilliant, he did such an incredible job playing Llewyn Davis. For more information on the film, visit the Official IMDb page.

Follow a week in the life of a young folk singer as he navigates the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. Guitar in tow, huddled against the unforgiving New York winter, he is struggling to make it as a musician against seemingly insurmountable obstacles — some of them of his own making.

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I’ve replaced a medium quality still of Oscar Isaac in The Two Faces of January with a high quality one. You can check it out below!

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“It opened doors immediately,” Oscar Isaac muses on working with the Coen brothers. “I got The Two Faces of January a couple of days after I had been cast in Inside Llewyn Davis. The trajectory completely changed once that happened.”

It’s no surprise that the actor’s soulful performance as down-at-heel folk singer Llewyn has proved to be such a turning point. In the two years that have passed since shooting, he’s gone from respected supporting player to compelling leading man, and was recently cast in a major role for JJ Abrams’s Star Wars: Episode VII.

Digital Spy sat down with Isaac this week to talk about his Star Wars fandom, the meaning of Inside Llewyn Davis’s much-discussed cat, and his role opposite Viggo Mortensen in this week’s Patricia Highsmith adaptation The Two Faces of January.

Hossein Amini has said that The Two Faces of January appealed to him as a novel because the characters’ motivations are so unclear, but don’t actors always want to know what their motivation is? Yeah, the motivation is important for me to act it, but I don’t necessarily want the audience to know my motivation. When you watch something, you don’t want to be told what to think, and when movies or performers try to prescribe that it usually doesn’t work, because the camera sees everything. You let the characters’ behavior happen and people will make their own decisions about what it is.

I had worked with Hoss before on Drive, and that was a really great experience because we had to completely remake the character together, and he was so open to it all, and such a gentleman. And when he showed me this script, the characters were so dark and complicated and you never knew what their motivations were, and that’s what I thrive on.

Your character Rydal has a very ambiguous dynamic with Viggo Mortensen’s Chester, it’s paternal but also homoerotic. How did you view their relationship? Well, Viggo is a very, very beautiful man, so there’s always gonna be erotic tension whenever he’s in the room. That work was done for me! But it was fascinating, yeah, Highsmith sets this up straight away and Hoss does the same. Rydal’s father has passed away, and it was clearly not a good relationship, he didn’t go home for the funeral. So suddenly he sees this man, Chester, and he represents everything he wants to be and also everything he hates, everything he wants to kill in himself. So that creates a whole well of emotions that are tapped at different moments.

The ending is much more cathartic and less cynical than the rest of the film leads you to expect – were you surprised by the finale? Yeah, I remember that being a strangely emotional moment. The irony is that it’s much more emotional than his earlier scene with Colette, who he is supposedly in love with. It’s a process of projection, or displacement, where he’s watching his father just disintegrate through Chester. And what Patricia Highsmith and Hoss both picked up on is showing people at their weakest, and ugliest. Viggo was never afraid to be ugly, or stupid, or foolish, and in fact he looked for those places.

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We [ShortList Mag] spoke to Oscar Isaac for the release of The Two Faces of January…and sneaked a few Star Wars questions in as well.